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Looking forward when you’ve lived more than one hundred years!

Happy birthday, Paul Johns at age 102

Happy birthday, Paul Johns at age 102

If you have good genes and reasonable health, your age is just a number.

Marjory Stoneman Douglas, centenarian plus eight

For the last twenty years of her remarkable life, I was special assistant and friend to Marjory Stoneman Douglas who wrote the book on the Florida Everglades, was its feisty Evangelist, earning kudos from presidents, queens and princes! I asked her at the occasion of her 100th birthday celebration, how old she’d think she was if she didn’t actually know and she answered, “Interesting question! Age thirty-five, I’d think.” Now at the time, she was both blind and deaf and couldn’t see the etching of old smiles lined across her face, so she chose the age at which she was most vigorously alive, pursuing goals, writing passionately. She was always a bit embarrassed by the fame and fuss advanced age delivered her though she used it to advance her cause. Born in 1890 she lived purposefully until the age of 108 years–just a number after all! It was my happy privilege to help her navigate the high expectations (her own and those of others) on declining energy through those last years of her life.

Paul Johns, centenarian plus two

We have another centenarian friend, Paul Johns of Iola, Wisconsin, in whom it’s easy to recognize several common traits with Marjory. He celebrates his 102nd birthday today! Paul looks and acts years younger, has a valid driver’s license–no restrictions and a current ham radio operator’s license good for another decade. With enough electronic gear for someone half his age, he stays in touch via email and Facebook. In his nineties he enrolled in technical school to learn how to repair computers. A few years later he designed and still builds arguably the best radio antenna for small, fabric-covered airplanes.

While others struggle with names and memory, our friend seemingly remembers everything. No problem meeting someone he hardly knows; even out of context he’ll call them by name. Engage him in conversation and you’ll learn interesting details from long ago and as recent as yesterday.

Paul Johns is a pilot’s pilot and an engineer’s engineer. An anecdote told by a friend reveals a small detail from a long and amazing life. As a nurse adjusted Paul’s blood pressure cuff, with humble tone he spoke a startling sentence that began, ” When I invented that . . . .”

Paul Johns first learned to fly in 1929 when he was fifteen years old followed by another 66 years of active piloting. In his mid-seventies he built an airplane that he flew into his eighties. Some years ago he was inducted into the Wisconsin Aviation Hall of Fame. Recently he was surprised and delighted by the renaming of Central County Airport near his hometown of Iola, Wisconsin, to be known as Paul Johns Field, an honor from the Central County Flyers and dozens of friends who join him on Fridays for the regionally well-known Lunch at Iola.

How to live to one hundred!

From these two I’ve learned that luck is another name for diligence and productivity. Both Marjory and Paul built purposeful lives that compelled them always onward and upward. Yes, they had luck on their side, but they also persevered through the challenges. Each of them collected a lifetime of unique experiences along with friends of all ages. Marjory never gave up and Paul still lives fully engaged, with a vigorous mind and plans for the future; there’s too much to do and a life to live. It reminds me that life is short no matter how long you live, that there is no do-over, that you’ll regret more what you didn’t do or try than what you tried and failed. Live!

Happy 102nd birthday, Paul! And thank you for these lessons.

 

 

A recent article by Jane Myhra in the Waupaca County Post highlighted select others of his lifetime achievements:

  • piloted the Boeing 314–the Flying Boat or Clipper–for Pan American Airways;
  • set up an instrument training program for Navy pilots in 1939;
  • recorded over 220 Pacific crossings during World War II for the Naval Transport Service, navigating the distance only by following the stars;
  • engineered, designed and built testing equipment to measure sound waves with laser light decades before most of us had even heard of lasers.

Sam needs his Forever Home; donation portrait to the Dog Art for Old Friends benefit to be held October 16, 2015. at the Omni Nashville

Sam needs his Forever Home; donation portrait to the Dog Art for Old Friends benefit to be held October 16, 2015. at the Omni Nashville

Senior dog needs forever home

The shepherd painted here is Sam, worn out from life on the farm and enjoying a satisfying midday rest among the cornstalks. But he’ll rise to greet anyone who comes along with an enthusiastically wagging tail. Sam understands the value of the trade—he’ll give love and loyalty for a good retirement home and someone who appreciates him.

Old Friends Senior Dog Sanctuary

Old Friends Senior Dog Sanctuary is a Forever Foster home-based Sanctuary in beautiful Mount Juliet, Tennessee. An important part of their mission is to raise awareness of the joys and challenges of living with older dogs. Senior dogs, especially those with medical problems or disabilities, face a much greater chance of euthanasia at shelters than younger dogs because it’s difficult to find adopters for them due to their shorter additional life expectancy and unknown veterinary costs. Most of these wonderful senior dogs will be able to live happily with a good quality of life if given a chance. They make wonderful companions because they are mature, calm and loving.  

It can be more difficult for them to settle in, and once they do, it is difficult for them to move again. For this reason they strive to find them forever foster or adoptive homes where they can live out their retirement years as a loved family member. Currently OFSDS provides lifetime retirement homes for 47 senior dogs at the Sanctuary and many more in temporary and Forever Foster Homes. They are an all volunteer 501(c)(3), non-profit.  They say, “We do not concern ourselves with the quantity of time that they have left, rather the quality of the life that we can provide them for that time.” Learn more about their mission at the OFSDS home page and blog and then LIKE them at Facebook!

Dog Art for Old Friends Benefit auction

The Nashville community of arts and artists including many names you would recognize has become a key supporter of the Senior Dogs Sanctuary. This year Light Pixie Studio is pleased to contribute to such a worthy cause. The second annual Dog Art for Old Friends benefit auction will be held at the Omni Nashville on October 16th with 100% of proceeds to help Old Friends. Tickets are available online for the live event and silent auction previews and bidding underway from May 1 to October 16, 2015.

Chipping Sparrow

Chipping Sparrow’s Punk Hair Day

Punk Hair Day

Nature is moving headlong toward summer. Spring wildflowers are springing forth.  Trees are fully dressed in a million shades of green. Last week we saw a doe nursing her fawn in the open meadow below our windows.  While Mama Chipping Sparrow is out of the nest working for her baby’s breakfast, I happen by to see her insistent chick complaining that it’s time to eat! More formally this infant sparrow is called a host. But today at this early hour, there’s nothing formal about it. Pin feathers akimbo and having a punk hair kind of day, we both stop to study one another.

Babies are beautiful!

As a recent grandmother babies are of renewed interest. And they’re all fascinating no matter their species. So today let’s be reminded of this: baby birds typically leave the nest before they’re ready to fly and once they do they will not typically return to it. This bird is fully feathered except for the tufts of down on the head but continues to depend on parents to bring it food and protect it from predators. It has not yet flown. I watched for many minutes while this little Albert Einstein mimic moved about the branches in front of our porch. Moved is a euphemism where I might just as well have said stumbled, lurched, or jostled headlong.

Good deed for the day!

It’s a myth that avian parents will reject a chick that has human scent on it as they have a very poorly developed sense of smell. If you find a baby bird where it might be trampled underfoot or harmed by a dog or a cat, by all means move it to a bush or branch a few feet off the ground, preferably out of the hot sun. And then watch from a distance but mostly leave it alone. The parents did not likely abandon it and will almost certainly return. In this case Mama Chipping Sparrow appeared suddenly on the downspout with her hard trilling chip warning me away. And there was breakfast in her bill. They eat mostly seeds and some crawling insects but I couldn’t tell what was on the du jour menu.

Chipping Sparrows are kindly birds by habit

These small birds are nice to watch as they are kind to one another by habit. Parents make pair bonds and fathers feed the mothers while they incubate four eggs. Once the young hatch both parents make food runs to sustain their brood. A week and a half later the young leave the nest just as this one did and within three days after that they are capable of weak but sustained flight. The feeding routine will continue for three more weeks as the young grow bigger and stronger. Worn out from the work of it, most parents will be satisfied with having done their duty for this year. Remember they are competent parents and know what to do far better than you. Their decline is because of competition from the Brown-headed cowbird, a nest predator, and not because of a parenting failure.

Then there is this legalese:

You may think you’re doing a good deed by “rescuing” a baby bird but in most cases it will do better without you. As a matter of fact, migratory bird laws protect all native wild birds in the US and Canada from possession for any reason, except transportation to a licensed rehabilitator, and that only in the direst of situations. It is against the law no matter how kindly your intentions may be and common sense dictates that, nestling or fledgling, you leave it be.

To learn more about the Chipping Sparrow check out the Cornell Ornithology Lab.

Here’s my newest commission and another Best of Breed animal. Meet Northwynd Everlasting “Sprite” who was born a tiny 4.6 ounces but grew into a star. Last year Sprite took the highest honor a purebred Pembroke Welsh Corgi can achieve in winning the Pembroke Welsh Corgi Club National Speciality!  With a sparkling career of many awards she’s a credit to her pedigree and to her breed, the product of a noble line, sired by a champion and mother to a pup who is already winning highest honors.

This painting shows baby Sprite looking at her puppy self in life’s mirror. Looking back at her and at us is the adult Sprite with her National Speciality ribbon adorning the frame.

There are two recognized corgi breeds, the Pembrokes and the Cardigans. The royal Windsors prefer the Pembrokes and actively encourage the breed. To win the National Speciality is the ultimate Best of Breed recognition for the dog and moreover for the breeder, owner, and trainers. In this case one dedicated woman wears all these hats. When asked what best describes all the work and worry, the years of commitment leading to Sprite’s success, she answered with the words that now title this painting.

“Freckles is my good friend. When we ride it feels like flying on wind. I wonder if Freckles feels me like a pair of new sprouted wings?”

This painting was commissioned by the young woman’s other friend to recognize an important achievement and to acknowledge a special place in the heart.

Friends

 

Glowing Beauty

This photo caused the subject to smile at what she saw as “awakened assets.”   Age is no disadvantage when you’re beautiful inside and out.

Canon xTi, 50 mm portrait lens, Aperture priority,  f5.6, 1/6 sec, ISO 200, raw CR2